marshotel:

Le projet d’adaptation de Neuromancien au cinoche en 1986 avec William Gibson et Timothy Leary. On voit aussi Earl Mac Rauch. Encore un super film qui va passer dans mon cinéma mental. 

Old neuromancer film promo

(via Twitter / ShreddingRobot: William Gibson (@GreatDismal) …)
French edition of Zero History just released.

(via Twitter / ShreddingRobot: William Gibson (@GreatDismal) …)

French edition of Zero History just released.

seeingworldsthatneverwere:


"…and then it no longer mattered, what he knew, tasting the salt of her mouth where tears had dried. There was a strength that ran in her, something he’d known in Night City and held there, been held by it, held for a while away from time and death, from the relentless Street that hunted them all. It was a place he’d known before; not everyone could take him there, and somehow he always managed to forget it. Something he’d found and lost so many times. It belonged, he knew—he remembered—as she pulled him down, to the meat, the flesh the cowboys mocked. It was a vast thing, beyond knowing, a sea of information coded in spiral and pheromone, infinite intricacy that only the body, in its strong blind way, could ever read."

- Neuromancer, William Gibson (1983)
(Chiba City Blues, Linda Lee - Illustration by Mikhail Rakhmatullin)

seeingworldsthatneverwere:

"…and then it no longer mattered, what he knew, tasting the salt of her mouth where tears had dried. There was a strength that ran in her, something he’d known in Night City and held there, been held by it, held for a while away from time and death, from the relentless Street that hunted them all. It was a place he’d known before; not everyone could take him there, and somehow he always managed to forget it. Something he’d found and lost so many times. It belonged, he knew—he remembered—as she pulled him down, to the meat, the flesh the cowboys mocked. It was a vast thing, beyond knowing, a sea of information coded in spiral and pheromone, infinite intricacy that only the body, in its strong blind way, could ever read."

Neuromancer, William Gibson (1983)

(Chiba City Blues, Linda LeeIllustration by Mikhail Rakhmatullin)

“I didn’t have a manifesto. I had some discontent. It seemed to me that midcentury mainstream American science fiction had often been triumphalist and militaristic, a sort of folk propaganda for American exceptionalism. I was tired of America-as-the-future, the world as a white monoculture, the protagonist as a good guy from the middle class or above. I wanted there to be more elbow room. I wanted to make room for antiheroes.
I also wanted science fiction to be more naturalistic. There had been a poverty of description in much of it. The technology depicted was so slick and clean that it was practically invisible. What would any given SF favorite look like if we could crank up the resolution? As it was then, much of it was like video games before the invention of fractal dirt. I wanted to see dirt in the corners.”
juiceonice:

"On an overcast morning in 1999, William Gibson, father of cyberpunk and author of the cult-classic novel Neuromancer, stepped into a limousine and set off on a road trip around North America. The limo was rigged with digital cameras, a computer, a television, a stereo, and a cell phone. Generated entirely by this four-wheeled media machine, No Maps for These Territories is both an account of Gibson’s life and work and a commentary on the world outside the car windows. Here, the man who coined the word “cyberspace” offers a unique perspective on Western culture at the edge of the new millennium, and in the throes of convulsive, tech – driven change.”

juiceonice:

"On an overcast morning in 1999, William Gibson, father of cyberpunk and author of the cult-classic novel Neuromancer, stepped into a limousine and set off on a road trip around North America. The limo was rigged with digital cameras, a computer, a television, a stereo, and a cell phone. Generated entirely by this four-wheeled media machine, No Maps for These Territories is both an account of Gibson’s life and work and a commentary on the world outside the car windows. Here, the man who coined the word “cyberspace” offers a unique perspective on Western culture at the edge of the new millennium, and in the throes of convulsive, tech – driven change.”

hpseaton:

the amazing mind - W. Gibson

hpseaton:

the amazing mind - W. Gibson

“Rydell caught something deep in her tired eyes, some combination of fear, resignation, and a kind of blind and automatic hope: she was not having a good morning, year, or life probably, but there was something there that wanted him to like her. Whatever it was, it stopped Rydell from getting up with his bag and walking out, which was really what he knew he should be doing.”
William Gibson, All Tomorrow’s Parties (via portionsofeternity)

INTERVIEWER

The world of the Sprawl is often called dystopian.

GIBSON

Well, maybe if you’re some middle-class person from the Midwest. But if you’re living in most places in Africa, you’d jump on a plane to the Sprawl in two seconds. Many people in Rio have worse lives than the inhabitants of the Sprawl.

I’ve always been taken aback by the assumption that my vision is fundamentally dystopian. I suspect that the people who say I’m dystopian must be living completely sheltered and fortunate lives. The world is filled with much nastier places than my inventions, places that the denizens of the Sprawl would find it punishment to be relocated to, and a lot of those places seem to be steadily getting worse.

real long real good Paris Review interview with William Gibson (via sivrt)

// might have already blogged/reblogged this excerpt…

Some Days

lorthos:

Just some days, he knew, the only thing you could do was read William Gibson novels and drink until things were better.

It didn’t always work, he knew that too, but by the time you figured that out you were lit up and wired up to a dark techno future that never quite was, so that was alright.

So he sighed, turned the page, and took another drink.

teleportcity:

Neuromancer

In the early 1990s, I read Neuromancer. I read it enthusiastically, devoured every word , and fell…

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teleportcity:

Neuromancer

In the early 1990s, I read Neuromancer. I read it enthusiastically, devoured every word , and fell…

View Post

“Are you really so scared of terrorists that you’ll dismantle the structures that made America what it is? If you are, you let the terrorist win. Because that is exactly, specifically, his goal, his only goal: to frighten you into surrendering the rule of law. That’s why they call him ‘terrorist.’ He uses terrifying threats to induce you to degrade your own society.”

Milgrim in Spook Country by William Gibson

(via juhavantzelfde)

Clichés crop up for a reason. It has become one to say of William Gibson’s near-future novels that he has a genius for picking out the seeds of future in the present, that he writes about the world we already know as if it were science fiction. I remember reading his Pattern Recognition in 2007, when I had a job as a shop-girl in a cyberpunk warehouse in Camden Lock Market in London and feeling the hairs on the back of my arms rise on the bus to work when I came to his description of the Lock as a “Children’s Crusade,” full of shuffling teenagers up from the provinces to buy overpriced pieces of space-kitch and fake fur boleros.

Yes, the lumpen shop fronts with their weird plaster statues of boots and bangles really did look a bit like they’d been modelled by a giant toddler out of plasticine. At the warehouse, we specialised in flogging plastic cyberware headsets and bits of tacky Japanalia to teenagers with pocket money to spare on the debris of the future everyone expected in 1987, 20 years on. We got timed for toilet breaks and occasionally fired for playing with the nerf guns on our breaks. It was the worst job I’ve ever had, and because the shop and the young punks who flocked to it were a paean to his aesthetic, I blame William Gibson for almost all of it.

This is why science fiction is dangerous. When Slavoj Žižek visited Occupy Wall Street in October, he drew protesters’ attention to the fact that “in mid-April 2011, the Chinese government prohibited on TV, films, and novels all stories that contain alternate reality or time travel. These people still dream about alternatives, so you have to prohibit this dreaming. Here, we don’t need a prohibition because the ruling system has even oppressed our capacity to dream.”

The Future, Probably – The New Inquiry

(via rafaelfajardo)